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Old 08-10-2007, 10:05 AM   #46
Rooz

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i'm bringing as many people who knows their stuff minus the bad attitudes over to throw their brains here.

i have a 98 540/6. done quite a few things to it... m5 diff, mtech bumpers, magnaflow exhaust and resonator, etc etc...

should be getting my car detailed tomorrow so i'll take some pics of it afterwards.

thanks for all your help Paul! hope to see more e39'ers here.
Can't wait for some pics
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Old 08-10-2007, 08:16 PM   #47
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Dan is a walking knowledge base for the 5er guys here, take advantage, we are truly lucky to have him lurking in our midst.
thanks for coming here bud.
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:28 PM   #48
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Climate control is affected by the outside temp reading. If the sensor is not functioning properly, it can affect (aoming other things) the climate control functions.

There is much confusion about how to set the temp setting, and the use of the blending dial in the centre dash vent.

You should set the "temp setting" to what you "normally" like - keeping in mind that you should probably set it a bit higher in summer than you do in winter - it really is not necessar to try and cool the car down to 70F. It is more comfortable at about 75 as long as you get rid of the humidity.

The blending dial in the center vent has a unique purpose to allow you to add some warmed air to the otherwise incoming air that is either strictly fresh outside air, or chiled by the A/C.

This is most useful in winter to get fresh air to the head area, but slightly warmed for comfort. I keep mine at about 1 red dot in the winter.

BUT - this dial can be a source of problems in the summer. Many people, thinking they want full cooling, will put it to 3 blue dots. This is OK for initial cooling of a hot car , but starts to present problems as the car reaches the desired temp as per your settings.

The system constantly chills all incoming air to the maximum (between 1 & 3C depending on outdoor temp) and then uses air passed over the heater to reheat the output so that it will get the car to the setting you selected. But, the only path for air from the heater portion into the fresh air portion is via the blending flap - which is in the main unit but controlled manually via a cable from that center dial with the dots - it opens a path between the 2 sections.

If you turn the dial to 3 blue dots you have closed that flap and there is no way for the system to reheat the air to the dash vents. In this case when the cabin temp starts to get below your setting the system has only one way to apply heat and that is to briefly open the floor vents and dump heat out there.

There is a whole lot more technical info about this, but to keep your life simple you should just leave the blending dial at 1-2 blue dots in the hot weather.
3 blues will give you a cold forehead and occasional hot feet (just in case that is what turns you on)


Also regarding control of interior temp are 2 additional items.

- keep the small vent area on the left of the climate control free of obstruction. That is where the air is pulled in across the cabin temp sensor. Blocking that vent, or placing a hot or cold drink in the cup holder will affect the reading of the cabin temp. The system will then compensate output in the other direction.

- do not direct the centre dash vents downward as that will pump cool (cold) air directly into the area where it is picked up by the same cabin temp sensor and the system will add more heat trying to get to the setting you have selected. The centre dash vents should be directed more upward as in over your head. The door vent could be more directed toward your lap if required, but even that can affect the temp sensor so adjust the flow at the dial accordingly.


The vent on the rear console is a "fresh air" or "A/C air" vent - same as the ones in the dash.

Later models have the "blending dial" on the right - same as the one in the center of the front dash vent. This allows you to "add" some warm air to the fresh air.

Earlier models did not have the blending dial in the rear, so you had to close that vent (turn the left dial) if it was too cold.

Idea for both these vent systems is to deliver "fresh air" to the upper part of the cabin (head area) to help with alertness.

Heat is delivered via the floor and upper dash vents - including to the rear seat by the large ducts under the front seats.
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:28 PM   #49
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I'll add some stuff about teh ///M audio upgrade that i've found. Credit goes to anyone who found info on it.

The details for the connectors are

61.13-1 378 136 This is the 12 pin connector to go to the DSP sub connection. 1 of these.
61.13-1 378 132 This is the 4 pin connector to connect to the M subs. 2 of these.
61.13-1 376 193 This is the part number for the pin (1.0 - 2.5mm2) to fit both housings. 16 of these.

I purchased the subs through www.bmaparts.com, speak to Patrick ONLY. I paid $205 per sub. I have a 9/97 production 540i 6-spd with DSP, and i had to drill my own holes. I must add that this was a huge pain.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hmmm . . . my notes are not quite as crisp as they seemed at the time:

Based on color coding of the wires, I have the following associations between the drivers and the wires in the connector, including polarity:

Rear left voicecoil 1 + yellow/red - gray/brown
Rear left voicecoil 2 + blue/white - blue/brown
Rear right voicecoil 1 + yellow/white - yellow/brown
Rear right voicecoil 2 + yellow/black - yellow/gray

I also think I use the wiring diagrams at http://www.bmwtips.com/ as reference. The connector my wires go into is a 12 pin connector, with the outside pins unused.

If you look at the attached picture, the following pin pairs each power 1 voicecoil:

5-4 3-2
11-10 9-8

(the subs are each have dual 8 ohm voicecoils)
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:31 PM   #50
Dan

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The replacements are very cheap (I found an 8-pack on ebay for $4.00 shipped) -- CR1220 Lithium Battery.

Just use a knife to pop open the back of the batter (there's a rectangle with a little spot where you can put the knife to pop it off). Unscrew the two phillips screws (need a pretty small screw driver), and just replace the battery. Make sure you put it in right side up
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:35 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Hotswimmer
HOW TO REPLACE THE THRUST ARMS ON YOUR E39 540I BMW

(1997-2003 5-SERIES V-8 CARS)


Most drivers of higher-mileage E39 BMW's have probably experienced the infamous shimmy that occurs in the front suspension at speeds between 50 and 60 MPH. The shimmy is often very pronounced when braking through the same speed range as well, giving the false impression of an out-of-round brake rotor. Assuming that your tires are properly balanced and aligned, and your lug nuts are properly tightened, the likeliest cause of this problem is worn out thrust arm bushings. Removing the thrust arms and installing new ones, or simply replacing the bushings once the thrust arms have been removed from the vehicle is a job that is well within the capabilities of a reasonably experienced shade-tree mechanic.

Whether you want to replace the entire arms or just the bushings is up to you, and the decision pretty much comes down to cost. The amount of work is about the same. The entire thrust arm assembly costs about $100 per side for OEM quality Lemforder units, whereas the bushings alone can be replaced for about $40. If you replace the whole arm, you're also getting a new ball joint on the front end, which probably isn't a bad idea on a higher mileage car. My feeling is, if you can't afford to drop $200 for a pair of new thrust arms, you really can't afford to be driving this car, especially in an era of $3.50 per gallon gasoline.

This is an illustrated do-it-yourself (DIY) write-up showing how to change the thrust arms on an E39 540i (model years 1997-2003). The subject car is a 1998 540iA. The job is conceptually the same on the 6-cylinder cars, but the front suspension and steering are somewhat different, so the pictures may not be an exact match. The procedure I followed is the one outlined in the Bentley manual. The driver's side of the car is shown in my pictures, but the passenger's side is identical.

This write-up is provided as a courtesy to other E39 enthusiasts, but your use of the information herein is entirely at your own risk. I assume no responsibility in the event of injury or adverse outcome resulting from the use of this information. Above all, BE SAFE and don't get in over your head. The labor for this task is only a few hundred dollars at a good, independent BMW mechanic's shop. It isn't worth life, limb or damage to your vehicle if you don't have the experience necessary to competently perform this procedure.

Suggested Tools and Supplies

-Floor jack
-2 jack stands
-4 blocks or car ramps
-Breaker bar with 4-inch extension, or tire wrench
-17mm socket for removing lug bolts
-13mm deep socket for removing sway bar bracket nuts
-16mm and 18mm socket and combination wrenches for loosening pinch nut and bolt on strut collar
-22mm combination wrench for removing ball joint nut
-21mm socket and combination wrenches for removing thrust arm bolt and nut
-Torque wrench
Large screwdriver, chisel, or other strong, flat-bladed tool for prying open pinch collar on strut
-Various lengths of extensions, universal joints, etc. for your socket wrench are helpful
-Ball joint removal tool (highly recommended)
-Permanent marker pen or paint to scribe reference line on strut tube
-Rags
-Denatured alcohol or lacquer thinner

Procedure

1) Make sure the car has a full tank of gas before you start (this is important later – you will need the weight of the fuel in the vehicle). Have the key in the ignition and unlock the steering wheel so you can turn the steering array as needed when you are working.

After loosening your lug bolts with the 17mm socket and breaker bar, get the car up on jacks. The front jack point for the E39 540i is shown in image #1 – you want the jack on those four big dented-out triangle sections which all point to that hole in the middle. I strongly suggest padding your floor jack and jack stands with a folded rag to avoid tearing up your car. You do not need to remove the splash shield from the bottom of the vehicle.



Images 2 and 3 show the car up on jacks from the front and side. I keep the floor jack under the front jack point as an added measure of safety. Chock the rear wheels for safety.





2) Lower the front sway bar – you need to do this to get room to reach the bolt that holds the bushing side of the thrust arm to the frame. The sway bar is held to the frame by two, large gold-colored brackets – one on each side of the car. You can see it in image #4 on the left side of the picture.



Remove the two nuts from the studs using a 13mm socket wrench, and pull off the brackets. The sway bar will only drop an inch or two, but that's all you need. You don't even need to remove the rubber bushings that are under the brackets – you can see one of these bushings in image #5.



The large bolt you will eventually remove to drop the bushing side of the thrust arm from the frame can be seen above and to the left of the rubber bushing on the sway bar in image #5.

3) Image #6 shows the bottom of the strut tube and the steering knuckle. At the bottom of the strut tube you can see two large nuts. The rear nut is the one that fastens the ball joint side of the thrust arm to the steering knuckle. The bottom of the strut tube is so close to those nuts that you can't get a wrench or ball joint puller on them. This necessitates lowering the steering knuckle.



In order to lower the steering knuckle (slide it down the strut tube), it will be necessary to loosen the pinch bolt in image #7 (also seen from the bolt end near the top of image #6). I used a 16mm wrench on the bolt and an 18mm wrench on the nut to do this. PRIOR TO LOOSENING IT, clean the area where the strut tube comes out the bottom of the pinch collar, and using paint or permanent marker, draw a line exactly where the strut comes out of the collar so you can properly reposition it later.



After you have loosened the pinch bolt (there is no need to remove it entirely), stick a large, heavyweight screwdriver, a large chisel or some other prying tool right in that slot where you see the middle of the pinch bolt in image #7, and pry the collar open a small amount. You can also stick a small chisel in the slot and then use a wrench to turn the chisel and pry the collar apart – this very closely simulates the special tool BMW dealer mechanics uses for this task. Either way, it will take a bit of force.

When the collar is open sufficiently far, grab the brake caliper or rotor and slide the steering knuckle down on the strut tube by pulling downward – it only needs to come down an inch to an inch and a half. Look at image #8 – you can see the clean, shiny part of the strut tube that was exposed after I slid the steering knuckle down. You may need to jiggle the steering knuckle assembly a bit, but it is heavy and should slide down without too much trouble.



4) As you can see in image #8, there is now enough room to get a wrench on the ball joint nut. Remove the nut using a 22mm combination wrench.
...
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:35 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by Hotswimmer
Now, the hard part – pressing the ball joint stud out of the steering knuckle. It is in there TIGHT. I would not do this job without a ball joint press of the type you see in image #9 and #10. I have read posts from guys who say they've been able to remove the ball joint using a pickle fork, or by banging on the top of the stud. You're on your own if you decide to go that route. I rejected that option from the start. Space is just too limited, and you're talking about banging around on aluminum suspension components here. I bought the ball joint tool at www.zdmak.com - (do a search on "ball joint") - it cost me about $40, but there are other sources and price ranges.





HOWEVER YOU DO IT, DON'T DON'T DON'T DAMAGE THE BALL JOINT AND BALL JOINT STUD IF YOU'RE JUST GOING TO CHANGE OUT THE BUSHINGS AND WILL BE RE-USING THE OLD THRUST ARM AND BALL JOINT. If you're replacing the whole thrust arm, then this isn't an issue. The steering knuckle will look like image #11 when you finally get the ball joint stud out.



5) Now we're ready to remove the bushing side of the thrust arm from the frame. This is easy by comparison to the last step. Image #12 shows you what it looks like in place.



Image #13 shows the 21mm socket wrench on the bolt that goes through the center of the bushing and holds the thrust arm to the frame. You can also see the end of the bolt in Image #5. You may need to jiggle the steering back and forth a little bit to get the socket wrench on the bolt – I did this just by grabbing the brake rotor and turning the steering a tad. There's not a lot of extra room to maneuver. You'll also need to have a 21mm combination wrench on the nut to keep it from slipping.



Once you have the nut off, pull the bolt out and you can drop the thrust arm. Again, you may need to jiggle the steering a bit this way or that to give yourself room to pull the bolt. Image #14 shows how the frame side looks with the thrust arm removed. Image #15 shows the old thrust arm with bushing, ball joint and retaining bolt and nut. At this point, you're halfway there on the driver's side, and the hardest part of the job is behind you.





If you're only replacing the thrust arm bushing and are re-using the old thrust arm and ball joint, this is where you will press the bad bushing out of the thrust arm and re-install the new one. I went with all new thrust arms, so I regret that I can't provide you with any counsel on this step. I understand it is possible to do this yourself, though it's a lot less trouble to simply take your old thrust arms to a mechanic's shop that has a hydraulic press and remove/replace your bushings that way.

6) Image #16 is a picture of the new Lemforder thrust arm. Leave the protective cap in place over the ball joint stud until the last minute when you are ready to push it into its hole on the steering knuckle. Wiggle the bushing side of the thrust arm into its place in the bracket on the frame of the car. Push the 21mm bolt back in and thread the nut back on. DO NOT TORQUE THE BOLT DOWN AT THIS TIME! Just put the nut on the bolt and hand-tighten it. Image #17 shows the new thrust arm in place on the bushing/frame side.





7) Remove the protective safety cap and insert the ball joint stud in its hole on the steering knuckle. Thread the 22mm nut onto the stud and tighten it. As you tighten the nut, it pulls the ball joint into its proper position – there's nothing special you have to do here. See Image #18. Using your torque wrench, tighten the 22mm nut to 80Nm (59 ft-lb).



8) Reposition (raise) the steering knuckle on the strut and tighten the pinch bolt. Using your torque wrench, tighten the pinch bolt to 81Nm (60 ft-lb). Again, this took a 16mm wrench on the bolt and an 18mm wrench on the nut on my car.

9) REPEAT STEPS 3 THROUGH 8 ON THE PASSENGER'S SIDE OF YOUR CAR.

10) Use denatured alcohol or lacquer thinner to clean your brake rotors if you grabbed them with your hands at some point during the procedure. Put the wheels back on the car and torque down the lug bolts. The lug bolts are 17mm, and should be torqued to 120NM (89 ft-lb) plus or minus 10Nm (7 ft-lb).

10) NOW we're going to tighten the bushing bolts on the thrust arms. The car needs to be LEVEL and SITTING ON ITS TIRES up on blocks or ramps, about 8 inches off the ground in front AND back. The car needs to be at spec ride height before you torque down the bolts. In addition to a full tank of gas (remember this?), you need about 150 pounds in each front seat, 150 pounds in the middle of the back seat, and 45 pounds in the trunk. If you're really anal you can measure and adjust the ride height further following the procedure in the Bentley manual, but this gets you plenty close enough. NOW you can get under the car and torque down the bolts that hold the bushing side of the thrust arm to the frame. Torque these 21mm bolts to 110Nm (81 ft-lb).

11) Re-install the sway bar brackets, making sure that the little nub on the rubber bushing fits in the corresponding hole in each bracket (See Image #5). Torque the 13mm nuts to 24Nm (18 ft-lb).

12) Lower the car to the ground and enjoy your shimmy-free ride! Incidentally, it is not necessary to have an alignment done following this procedure.
thanks to Randy for this writeup and pictures.
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Old 08-20-2007, 10:39 PM   #53
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Old 08-25-2007, 02:16 PM   #54
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Dan,

I can't find a magnaflow resonator. Would you be so kind as to point me in the right direction to find one?

Also, do you have sound clips of your exhaust system? I would like to hear them. I only have a Remus exhaust, but am contemplating the straight pipe/resonator delete in my car.

Also, do you know much about headers? As I have an extra set of M5/540 headers in my garage and would like to have them modified as opposed to buying a set of supersprint headers.

Thanks

Paul
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Old 09-08-2007, 09:08 PM   #55
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Replacing Thrust Arms on E39 530i

I just did this today, what a PITA. Though I'd share some of my experience. Replacing the thrust arms, or as BMW calls them "tension struts", on a 530i is similar to the 540i DIY in post #51 of this thread, except for a few key differences:

--The arms are installed in reverse from that of the 540i; that is, the ball joint sits above the steering knuckle, not below. This means that you have to slide the steering knuckle down even further than on the 540 to get the ball joint out.

--Also, the 530 has a metal cylindrical insert pressed into the steering knuckle where the ball joint's stem goes in. If you're not using the ball joint tool as shown in post #51 above, and are trying to pop the stem out with a hammer, this insert will pop out instead with the ball joint stem still intact. I had the tool, but its jaws weren't wide enough to grab the ball joint. It's possible that the 525/528/530 arms have longer ball joint stems. Once the thrust arm is off the car, you can use a puller to remove the insert- but be very careful where you attach the puller jaws or you'll end up destroying the insert, which you need to reattach to the steering knuckle.

--On the 530, the sway bar link needs to be disconnected from the steering knuckle, instead of the sway bar bushing in the case of the 540i . . the two are mounted differently, and the 530's bushing assembly does not interfere with the removal of the thrust arm. However, the link has to be disconnected in order to slide the steering knuckle down the strut shaft.

--In order to pull out the bushing bolt on the 530's thrust arm, you must remove the brake ducts as well as the front fender well liner. There is also a plastic cover that goes over the bushing assembly that has to be removed.
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:35 PM   #56
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you saved us soo much time! thank you
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:12 AM   #57
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you saved us soo much time! thank you
anytime and if you have something to share about these tips like Dudesky has, share! your experience what made it easier.

thanks!
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Old 07-03-2009, 06:07 PM   #58
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More on the 530i Thrust Arms

'Tight' is one mother of an understatement when it comes to the ball joint. And on the 530i, the pin sits so far from the edge of the steering knuckle that the normal 'universal' ball joint separator won't reach the tip. But i tried anyway, and set the remover to bear on the lip of the nut. Unfortunately the bang I heard after cranking and cranking was the separator pin shearing cleanly into three pieces.

So here's what I did, and I recommend it to anyone who gets stuck and frustrated and is thinking of getting that custom, ZDMak $200 BMW e39 tool. Remove the main control arm bolt and lower the arm, fully remove the pinch bolt (to get the sensor wire bracket out of the way), note the spacing and crank out / release the steering tie-rod link, and remove the brake caliper and the anti-lock sensor wire. Assuming you've already disconnected the sway bar drop link & thrust arm inner bushing, this'll drop the entire knuckle c/w brake rotor, control arms & steering tie rod in one not-too-hefty piece. Stick it in a secure mount, get a BFH, and knock the damn thrust pin out, along with the steel sleeve of course. You can remove the sleeve with a simple adjustable puller or pickle fork (and it'll come off the pin with that bang you've been anxiously awaiting!). To reinstall the sleeve, I simply squeezed it back into the knuckle using a bolt/spacer/washer set-up.

Re-assembly took about 15 minutes, caliper and all. After spending a full day on the driver's side, needless to say I will not even consider trying to crank out the other side with another lame, Grade-5 steel 'universal' tool. And if you're real careful with the steering link, the alignment won't get screwed.
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Old 09-17-2009, 12:47 AM   #59
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You say your radiator blew up on you? you notice that "CHECK COOLANT LEVEL" on the OBC now? does your 5 look like it took a leak over night in the garage and didn't wipe up? that would be the uber weak cooling system bmw's seems to have not yet master (on top of the electrical).

what to do you say? well, if you notice a leak, take care of it quick! if you just had it done and it still leaks, check the gaskets unless you have a Geba water pump. Yes, Geba will not only look tougher but will leak on you in a few thousand miles (ask me how i know). the system doesn't leak and shouldn't.

if your radiator blew up, don't go cheap. it's a BMW, drop the extra coin for the expansion tank (that's in line to let you down) and the water pump as well as the thermostat. get them all at once. where to get? that's up to you but definitely run down to the dealer and get the water pump gasket. i used one in the box (could have just been because it's made by Geba) and it leaked from the get-go. pretty sweet huh?

let's start with the radiator. you can go with a Behr which is OE. nothing really wrong with it except it's made of plastic and it'll let you down agian... guaranteed. but the price of it isn't so bad so spring one if you like. it comes with ridges in the neck to give it an extra "grip" so the pipe doesn't just slide off.
you can also spring for a Nissen (not Nissan and not the brand that makes noodles) radiator. Some say they are made better but it's still plastic. the radiator neck is smooth then ribbed so some say in certain conditions, the upper radiator hose *might* slip off. who knows, it could just be crappy workmanship or the truth. either way, it's something to think about. the longevity of this "aftermarket" radiator is said to be above OE but some have doubts.
if you are in true baller status and really want to make sure the radiator is a thing of the past, you can fork over a nice coin for this:
http://www.zionsvilleautosport.com/s...egory_Code=AR1

it's a lot more then the cost of a Behr or Nissen but it'll never ever let you down EVER again.

so now you'll need an expansion tank. it's that extra canteen looking thing humped on the radiator. yes, it too is made of plastic and it too will fail on you. There's OE's which will work fine since you are going to replace the radiator with the expansion tank all at once so might as well fork over the cash for it; don't get cheap on this, your motor is dependent on this like you are with your liver; sure you can live with 1/2 a liver but do you really want to?
again, if you are a baller and really have no patience for things failing over and over again, get a Lexus... Just kidding! if you are tired of servicing your cooling system, here's the package made just for you:
http://www.zionsvilleautosport.com/s...egory_Code=CCS

yes, the price says it all but you know what? you're NEVER EVER going to post: "i got stuck because of my radiator".

so we covered the radiator and the expansion tank. 2 very critical components and like death and taxes, will definitely fail on you. you should also look into the water pump. the OE pressed aluminum foil impeller is good to be used as a home made spinner firework. you do have some choices but i will say this: NOT GEBA. E36 guys have had hell with them and so have I. it was too late for me though. i bought it and half way thru the install i read about a post noting the failure rates of Geba water pump. There's other out there that you can get is very good news. Graf is the OE replacement and it serves it's purpose, pump water around the block. it's OE so you're still going to get the pressed aluminum foil quality impeller but think of it this way: it was working fine so why re-invent the wheel. if it worked before, it should work again. nothing wrong to think like that and many have gone this route. there are other options as far as water pumps since the price could make the difference. Laso is another water pump out there. built of the same quality, it serves it purpose and serves it well. neither of them are price too far from each other so it's a matter of personal preference. A new contender that i never heard of but it's been raved by the fanatical Volvo owners (those who own a true Volvo, before Ford took over and as much as i hate to stereotype, they are truly into getting quality parts because anything less then perfect will freak them out, maybe that's why they don't own a BMW) is the brand: Hepu. it could be found here:
Hepu water pump


it's a bit more (like $20... just skip out on your kid's allowance for a week or something) but i'm going to try it out and report back.

thermostat is a thermostat is a thermostat unless you go for the cooler popping ones but that's a special case and i'm not going to cover it. this part isn't expensive and they are usually priced all the same (give or take) but you REALLY should replace it. last thing you want to do is fuck youself by not replacing this part and having it go bad or worse.. leak and short your ECU.


if you need cooling system parts, contact Bill (Bill@bimmerclinic.com).
Good information in this thread and this forum: I'm new here and live in Copenhagen.
I have not had specific problems with Nissen radiators. The full Alloy version produced by Zionsville makes You believe that it will never ever let You down... However a radiator is clogging up inside like Your Coffee-maker, and after 6-8 years it will not cool more than half the amount it did, when new, regardless full alloy frame or not. You can delay the problem by rinsing it like You do with Your coffeemaker every once in a while.
And here is how You can preserve the Behr or Nissen radiator: It is probably the pressure build-up at the entrance caused by decreased flow which causes the plastic frame to crack.
BMW Service instructions tells You to change the coolant every 2 years. Use a high quality coolant. If You at the same time flush Your radiator with a cleaner then it will last much longer, even the Behr or the Nissen - which I prefer when buying a new.
If You stick to the same old radiator and never changes the coolant, then usually it will clogg-up, and then during summer, driving slowly in dense traffic, the cooling system can't do the job and the engine overheat. Even the waterpump is probably overloaded or stressed too much when the radiator flow is hampered. So using a radiator, which will last and last despite the clogging, will cause faults elsewhere, eventually causing the engine to overheat = Blown cylinderheadgasket or worse...
Remember that app 40% af all breakdowns are caused from lack of service to the cooling system...
Re cooling hoses: change them when they grow in diameter - often close to the hoseclamps. And use high quality hoseclamps always...Dont use grease if the hose is difficult to mount, rubber is lubricated with a little water, and check again after ventilating the cooling system.
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Old 03-27-2010, 10:02 PM   #60
ododod60

Name: ododod60
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Your Ride: 2002 530i
Anyone have info on repair of twisting seats. My 02 530i passenger seat base and back twist whenever any adjustments are made. Sometimes you can play around with the seat and get an adjustment that's acceptable but it's really annoying. HELP!!
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